March Madness!

10% OFF Everything You Need For Spring

  • Heartgard Plus (6, 9, and 12 month supplies)
  • Frontline Plus
  • Heartworm Tests
  • Microchips
  • Leptospirosis Vaccine
  • Rattlesnake Vaccine

New Clients Welcome! Call (970) 416-0232 for more details or to schedule an appointment.

 

A chance to win

Purchase a minimum of 9 months of Heartgard (for one pet) and be entered into a drawing to win (winners choice!) one of the following:

6 month membership to a Wine of the Month Club (1 red, 1 white mailed to you each month for 6 months)

-OR-

Outdoor Package

  • Rocky Mountain National Park / Arapaho National Recreation Area Annual Pass
  • Naturehike Outdoor Sport Backpack
  • Basic Travel First Aid Kit for Dogs

 

Heartworms & Heartworm Test

Why is a heartworm test important?

Before starting a heartworm preventative, your dog should be tested.

  • Giving certain types of preventatives to dogs that have an adult heartworm infection can be harmful or even fatal to the pet.
  • Heartworm preventatives do not kill the adult heartworms (although they may shorten the worms’ life expectancy). This means an infected dog will remain infected with adult heartworms. Unfortunately, as long as a pet remains infected, heartworm disease will progress and damage your pets heart and lungs, which can lead to life threatening problems. Giving heartworm preventatives to heartworm-positive dogs can mislead an owner into thinking everything is all right, while within a pet, heartworm disease is worsening.
  •  The parasite preventative that we recommend, Heartgard, only kills existing immature heartworms introduced to your dog over the past 30 days. It does not protect against worms introduced over 30 days prior to or after the Heartgard chew is consumed. Below is an illustration to better explain what can happen if you start a heartworm preventative without testing first.

heartworm testing

What exactly is a heartworm?

A heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) is a parasitic roundworm that is spread from host to host through the bites of mosquitoes. The heartworm is a type of filaria, a small thread-like worm, that causes filariasis.

The definitive host is the dog, but it can also infect cats, wolves, coyotes, foxes and other animals, such as ferrets, sea lions and even, under very rare circumstances, humans. The parasite is commonly called “heartworm”; however, adults often reside in the pulmonary arterial system (lung arteries) as well as the heart, and a major effect on the health of the animal is a manifestation of damage to the lung vessels and tissues. Occasionally, adult heartworms migrate to the right heart and even the great veins in heavy infections.

Heartworm infection may result in serious disease for the host, with death typically as the result of congestive heart failure.

Other parasites to protect your dog & family against.

Hookworms

heartworm

Hookworms live in the intestines and feed on intestinal tissue, which results in blood loss and inflammation. Severe infestation can lead to anemia, debilitation, and death (especially in puppies).

How do people get hookworms?

• Penetrating the body directly through the skin, most commonly through bare feet
• Accidentally ingesting along with infective soil
• Bringing their hands to their mouths after touching contaminated soil or objects

What happens when a person is infected with hookworms?

• Because humans are not natural hosts for hookworms, they migrate throughout the entire body causing damage wherever they go.
• Their migration path is just under the skin causing rashes, eruptions, and itching.
• Occasionally, they may go deeper inside the body inflaming internal organs.
• In rare cases, they will invade the small intestine of the human.

Roundworms

heartworm
Infecting over 90% of puppies under three months old, roundworms are among the most common intestinal parasites in dogs. Roundworms also live in the intestines and they deprive their host of all nutrients. Symptoms of roundworms include diarrhea, weight loss, swollen abdomen, and vomiting.

Roundworms are transmitted through the mother’s placenta or milk, or through contact with the feces of an infected animal.

How do people get roundworms?

•  Accidentally ingesting the worms’ eggs in soil
• Bringing their hands to their mouths after touching contaminated soil or objects

What happens with a person is infected with roundworms?

• Because humans are not natural hosts for roundworms, they migrate throughout the entire body causing damage wherever they go.
•  They damage the liver, heart or lungs, and can even be fatal if they infect the heart or brain
•  They can cause impaired sight and loss of vision
•  Roundworms are still the #1 reason for blindness in children

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